Who won today’s wood war?
"Speaking of which: The news that Bar Rafaeli topped Maxim's “HOT 100” list has no legs, but lots of leg, and a bare bottom, and a pretty face. A shot of Rafaeli lying nude on the beach is only tenuously connected to any of the material inside: a guide to local beaches and a “SEEN & HEARD” item in which Rafaeli is photographed with a pilot on a flight to Los Angeles. Pretty skimpy!” - Tom McGeveran in The Front, his daily assessment of New York’s tabloids.

"Speaking of which: The news that Bar Rafaeli topped Maxim's “HOT 100” list has no legs, but lots of leg, and a bare bottom, and a pretty face. A shot of Rafaeli lying nude on the beach is only tenuously connected to any of the material inside: a guide to local beaches and a “SEEN & HEARD” item in which Rafaeli is photographed with a pilot on a flight to Los Angeles. Pretty skimpy!” - Tom McGeveran in The Front, his daily assessment of New York’s tabloids.

Clayton Osbon: he’s no Steven Slater, but he’s tabloid-ready nonetheless.

Tags: media tabloids

The city tabloids and the fate of Greg Kelly, morning anchor accused of rape
by Joe Pompeo | Capital New York

In sensational cases like this, the tabloids have their bread and butter (or is it meat and potatoes?). There is clear conflict, two sides; the trick is not to be forced to play the mealy-mouthed referee, constantly shifting focus from one side or the other and losing focus for your own front page. For a big celebrity scandal like this, it is necessary to take sides as early as possible.

The city tabloids and the fate of Greg Kelly, morning anchor accused of rape

by Joe Pompeo | Capital New York

In sensational cases like this, the tabloids have their bread and butter (or is it meat and potatoes?). There is clear conflict, two sides; the trick is not to be forced to play the mealy-mouthed referee, constantly shifting focus from one side or the other and losing focus for your own front page. For a big celebrity scandal like this, it is necessary to take sides as early as possible.


Daily News: “EVIL,” read the huge white letters on today’s front, over a picture of a feral-looking Luis Ortiz. (This is a man with the nickname “Baby,” but who my sister said looked to her like the kind of Lifetime Movie Network villain whose onscreen soundtrack would be some kind of industrial metal—”bad guy music,” in other words.)

I like when Tom's The Front gets a little intimate about how he processes the front pages.

Daily News: “EVIL,” read the huge white letters on today’s front, over a picture of a feral-looking Luis Ortiz. (This is a man with the nickname “Baby,” but who my sister said looked to her like the kind of Lifetime Movie Network villain whose onscreen soundtrack would be some kind of industrial metal—”bad guy music,” in other words.)

I like when Tom's The Front gets a little intimate about how he processes the front pages.

Tags: media tabloids

Nanny Bloomberg - Tom’s mockup of Mayor Bloomberg using an old photo of the famous axe-wielding Prohibition bar-smasher Carry Nation. Context.

Nanny Bloomberg - Tom’s mockup of Mayor Bloomberg using an old photo of the famous axe-wielding Prohibition bar-smasher Carry Nation. Context.

"Most of the page is taken up with today’s mission piece. ‘LIP SERVICE’  reads the knockout-white text in the black field, next to a picture of  Andrew Cuomo in one of his signature poses that looks half Home Alone, half angry principal.” - Tom has been especially punchy in his wood war column this week.

"Most of the page is taken up with today’s mission piece. ‘LIP SERVICE’ reads the knockout-white text in the black field, next to a picture of Andrew Cuomo in one of his signature poses that looks half Home Alone, half angry principal.” - Tom has been especially punchy in his wood war column this week.

"Go ahead and brew yourself a General Foods International Coffee Swiss   Mocha and curl up with a hand-knitted afghan while I tell you the story of Monsignor Robert Ritchie.
Back? OK!”
Read on.

"Go ahead and brew yourself a General Foods International Coffee Swiss Mocha and curl up with a hand-knitted afghan while I tell you the story of Monsignor Robert Ritchie.

Back? OK!”

Read on.

Tags: tabloids media

"The lottery screws the poor to begin with," the 19-year-old Brooklyn College sophomore told a reporter. "The fact that rich men won is an insult."

"The lottery screws the poor to begin with," the 19-year-old Brooklyn College sophomore told a reporter. "The fact that rich men won is an insult."

A day for ‘sacrilege’: Victoria’s plainly visible secret, bugs on a crucifix and the end of Paterno

It’s time for the annual Victoria’s Secret Angels show, which you forget about every year until it happens again and women in brassieres  are on the front page of your newspaper. This is when underwear that  never really gets worn, one step up from Fredricks of Hollywood, gets a  fashion show. (Is this sacrilege?) It’s always easy to make a bad pun  from the already clever name of the brand. It’s almost hard to make one  as bad as the one that flanks a picture of a model whose breasts are  cupped in pearls and jewels and little else: "What’s Victoria’s Secret?"

A day for ‘sacrilege’: Victoria’s plainly visible secret, bugs on a crucifix and the end of Paterno

It’s time for the annual Victoria’s Secret Angels show, which you forget about every year until it happens again and women in brassieres are on the front page of your newspaper. This is when underwear that never really gets worn, one step up from Fredricks of Hollywood, gets a fashion show. (Is this sacrilege?) It’s always easy to make a bad pun from the already clever name of the brand. It’s almost hard to make one as bad as the one that flanks a picture of a model whose breasts are cupped in pearls and jewels and little else: "What’s Victoria’s Secret?"

Tags: media tabloids

laughingsquid:

Khadafy Killed by Yankee Fan

What irks me is that this bad-faith sale probably will gain readers this  morning; and that even readers who habitually fall for the Post's  tricks never end up quite adding it all up: That the wilder the sale,  the more likely they will start thinking about the 75 cents they just  dished out as soon as they've done reading what's there. It's too bad. - Tom McGeveran on today’s tabloid covers.

laughingsquid:

Khadafy Killed by Yankee Fan

What irks me is that this bad-faith sale probably will gain readers this morning; and that even readers who habitually fall for the Post's tricks never end up quite adding it all up: That the wilder the sale, the more likely they will start thinking about the 75 cents they just dished out as soon as they've done reading what's there. It's too bad. - Tom McGeveran on today’s tabloid covers.

brooklynmutt:

‘Monster’ Hurricane Irene is headed right for us, pretty much, almost!
Capital New York: Each day, the New York tabloids vie to sell readers at the newsstands on outrageous headlines, dramatic photography, and, occasionally, great reporting. Who is today’s winner?

Let us know what you think here!

brooklynmutt:

‘Monster’ Hurricane Irene is headed right for us, pretty much, almost!

Capital New York: Each day, the New York tabloids vie to sell readers at the newsstands on outrageous headlines, dramatic photography, and, occasionally, great reporting. Who is today’s winner?

Let us know what you think here!

Have you been reading Tom McGeveran’s The Front columns, since the DSK case broke? He is brilliant, as always, but especially on this subject. 
An excerpt from today’s:

So it is that the Post can appear to hold itself to a higher  reporting standard, but have the right to publish other, less  strigently monitored but more salacious material without getting its  hands dirty, simply by attributing it to TMZ.com or RadarOnline. An  added bonus is that if the Post later finds out those reports are untrue, they get to gloat.
…
This  is not the only way to do things, but the other way is less  labor-intensive and often less commerically rewarding. For as long as I  can remember, serious political reporters have been calling candidates  to ask them bluntly, “Did you have an affair with …?” Sometimes it even  happens at the instigation of unscrupulous opposition researchers and  muckrakers. At a certain point it just becomes necessary anyway. The  pacts between reporters and sources are professional ones, and while  there is a loose ethical code to them, to be sure, what transpires in a  conversation between a reporter and his or her sources is not what  really matters until the reporting is deployed in published material.  That means that reporter, however aggressive his or her reporting  practice, is doing the job, and so are the editors, when the reporting  is aggressive and the treatment in the finished article is fair and  accurate, according to the honest judgments of everyone involved in its  publication.

Read more——>

Have you been reading Tom McGeveran’s The Front columns, since the DSK case broke? He is brilliant, as always, but especially on this subject.

An excerpt from today’s:

So it is that the Post can appear to hold itself to a higher reporting standard, but have the right to publish other, less strigently monitored but more salacious material without getting its hands dirty, simply by attributing it to TMZ.com or RadarOnline. An added bonus is that if the Post later finds out those reports are untrue, they get to gloat.

This is not the only way to do things, but the other way is less labor-intensive and often less commerically rewarding. For as long as I can remember, serious political reporters have been calling candidates to ask them bluntly, “Did you have an affair with …?” Sometimes it even happens at the instigation of unscrupulous opposition researchers and muckrakers. At a certain point it just becomes necessary anyway. The pacts between reporters and sources are professional ones, and while there is a loose ethical code to them, to be sure, what transpires in a conversation between a reporter and his or her sources is not what really matters until the reporting is deployed in published material. That means that reporter, however aggressive his or her reporting practice, is doing the job, and so are the editors, when the reporting is aggressive and the treatment in the finished article is fair and accurate, according to the honest judgments of everyone involved in its publication.

Read more——>

Goodbye, Bill Gallo; Good grief, Will Smith by Tom McGeveran

The New York Post: If you’re not  dedicating your cover to an obituary of a beloved employee, there’s  apparently not much else to do. Which is why the Post must have decided to complain about the size of Will Smith’s trailer at the Soho set of his coming movie, Men in Black III. The Post has only gathered two neighborhood residents and one shopkeeper to  complain along with them, and there’s no statistic for us about 311  calls or anything similar; there’s been no community board discussion  that we’re aware of from the article, and no statement from a  councilmember, though that may follow their front-page story. It’s just a  very big trailer.

Goodbye, Bill Gallo; Good grief, Will Smith by Tom McGeveran

The New York Post: If you’re not dedicating your cover to an obituary of a beloved employee, there’s apparently not much else to do. Which is why the Post must have decided to complain about the size of Will Smith’s trailer at the Soho set of his coming movie, Men in Black III. The Post has only gathered two neighborhood residents and one shopkeeper to complain along with them, and there’s no statistic for us about 311 calls or anything similar; there’s been no community board discussion that we’re aware of from the article, and no statement from a councilmember, though that may follow their front-page story. It’s just a very big trailer.

"Well, these are both incoherent." - Tom McGeveran.

"Well, these are both incoherent." - Tom McGeveran.

Tags: tabloids Obama