“I recently heard that 30 billion images a year are being created by people with devices, cameras, and phones,” photographer Doug Rickard said. “So every artist, ultimately, whether they are producing images or working with material, has to navigate and make selections that have a profound meaning or narrative.”

How do you make profound photography in a world of Instagram, Facebook galleries, and iPhones?

“I recently heard that 30 billion images a year are being created by people with devices, cameras, and phones,” photographer Doug Rickard said. “So every artist, ultimately, whether they are producing images or working with material, has to navigate and make selections that have a profound meaning or narrative.”

How do you make profound photography in a world of Instagram, Facebook galleries, and iPhones?


“Yes, very few people could hang and get all-access today,” Diltz said. “You have to gain their trust, they have to really get to know you and accept you being there. You have to really know how to back off, sorta learn how to be a fly on the wall. And respect them. I don’t think you can be one of them, and like join in … because you’re not one of them. So that’s the wrong approach. I can’t be an aggressive type of photographer, just hustling to get the photo. You got to be cool, that comes first.”

Photographers talk about shooting the Stones, in all their dark, magic coolness

“Yes, very few people could hang and get all-access today,” Diltz said. “You have to gain their trust, they have to really get to know you and accept you being there. You have to really know how to back off, sorta learn how to be a fly on the wall. And respect them. I don’t think you can be one of them, and like join in … because you’re not one of them. So that’s the wrong approach. I can’t be an aggressive type of photographer, just hustling to get the photo. You got to be cool, that comes first.”

Photographers talk about shooting the Stones, in all their dark, magic coolness

Bronx Boys: A Digital Monograph by Stephen Shames
Let’s get it out of the way: the body of remarkable photographs currently on display at the Guggenheim Museum’s fourth-floor annex, through June 13, were produced by Francesca Woodman between 1975 and 1981, the year she killed herself at the age of 22 by jumping out of the window of her New York loft …
Compellingly lurid though the subject of Woodman’s suicide may be, to dwell on it is to miss the full splendor of her photographs, their full range of influences (and afterlives), their sly beauty and humor.
[Read more at Capital New York]

Let’s get it out of the way: the body of remarkable photographs currently on display at the Guggenheim Museum’s fourth-floor annex, through June 13, were produced by Francesca Woodman between 1975 and 1981, the year she killed herself at the age of 22 by jumping out of the window of her New York loft

Compellingly lurid though the subject of Woodman’s suicide may be, to dwell on it is to miss the full splendor of her photographs, their full range of influences (and afterlives), their sly beauty and humor.

[Read more at Capital New York]

Massimo Vitali’s huge, blown-out beach scenes interrogate what the West calls ‘leisure’
Weegee: Murder Is My Business
Title: Their First Murder

Weegee: Murder Is My Business

Title: Their First Murder

saturnrising:

The Accordion Player, Brooklyn, New York, 1959 (via firsttimeuser)

nycdigital:

[Did you know?] Between 1939 and 1941, and again in the mid-1980s, the city photographed every house and building in the five boroughs. 

You can check out these photos and more at the Municipal Archives Online Gallery

life:

Twice a year — once for fall, and again for spring — the already chic city of New York gets a sprinkle of extra glamour, with the coming of Fashion Week. For those few days, the designers, models, celebrities, magazine editors, and fashion risk-takers who converge on Lincoln Center, headquarters of the ready-to-wear shows, make for some of the best people-watching there is.
Photojournalist Zoran Milich shows us his unique perspective here.

life:

Twice a year — once for fall, and again for spring — the already chic city of New York gets a sprinkle of extra glamour, with the coming of Fashion Week. For those few days, the designers, models, celebrities, magazine editors, and fashion risk-takers who converge on Lincoln Center, headquarters of the ready-to-wear shows, make for some of the best people-watching there is.

Photojournalist Zoran Milich shows us his unique perspective here.

ifyouseesomethingsaysomething:

The calm before the storm
Hudson River, New York

ifyouseesomethingsaysomething:

The calm before the storm

Hudson River, New York

(via esquared)

liquidnight:

“There are roughly three New Yorks.
There is, first, the New York of the man or woman who was born here, who takes the city for granted and accepts its size and turbulence as natural and inevitable.
Second, there is the New York of the commuter—the city that is devoured by locusts each day and spat out each night.
Third, there is the New York of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New York in quest of something. Of these three trembling cities the greatest is the last—the city of final destination, the city that is a goal. It is this third city that accounts for New York’s high-strung disposition, its poetical deportment, its dedication to the arts, and its incomparable achievements. Commuters give the city its tidal restlessness; natives give it solidity and continuity; but the settlers give it passion. And whether it is a farmer arriving from Italy to set up a small grocery store in a slum, or a young girl arriving from a small town in Mississippi to escape the indignity of being observed by her neighbors, or a boy arriving from the Corn Belt with a manuscript in his suitcase and a pain in his heart, it makes no difference: each embraces New York with the intense excitement of first love, each absorbs New York with the fresh eyes of an adventurer, each generates heat and light to dwarf the Consolidated Edison Company.”
— E.B. White, Here is New York
[photo via All Things Amazing, photographer unknown]

Required reading, always. 

liquidnight:

“There are roughly three New Yorks.

There is, first, the New York of the man or woman who was born here, who takes the city for granted and accepts its size and turbulence as natural and inevitable.

Second, there is the New York of the commuter—the city that is devoured by locusts each day and spat out each night.

Third, there is the New York of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New York in quest of something. Of these three trembling cities the greatest is the last—the city of final destination, the city that is a goal. It is this third city that accounts for New York’s high-strung disposition, its poetical deportment, its dedication to the arts, and its incomparable achievements. Commuters give the city its tidal restlessness; natives give it solidity and continuity; but the settlers give it passion. And whether it is a farmer arriving from Italy to set up a small grocery store in a slum, or a young girl arriving from a small town in Mississippi to escape the indignity of being observed by her neighbors, or a boy arriving from the Corn Belt with a manuscript in his suitcase and a pain in his heart, it makes no difference: each embraces New York with the intense excitement of first love, each absorbs New York with the fresh eyes of an adventurer, each generates heat and light to dwarf the Consolidated Edison Company.”

— E.B. White, Here is New York

[photo via All Things Amazing, photographer unknown]

Required reading, always. 

(via skibinskipedia)

sarahwrotethat:

Madison Ave 1911 vs 2010. Photos via Shorpy:

1909: “Madison Avenue and the towers.” Starring the new  Metropolitan Life building. Detroit Publishing glass negative.

2010: looking south from 30th Street by Shorpy user  timeandagainphoto

sarahwrotethat:

Madison Ave 1911 vs 2010. Photos via Shorpy:

1909: “Madison Avenue and the towers.” Starring the new Metropolitan Life building. Detroit Publishing glass negative.

2010: looking south from 30th Street by Shorpy user timeandagainphoto

Dancers among us in NYC, a series of photos by Jordan Matter.
donohoe:

Berenice Abbott/Commerce Graphics and Metropolitan Museum of Art Photography After Dark, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, includes Berenice Abbott’s “Nightview, New York,” from 1932.
Source: ‘Night Vision - Photography After Dark,’ at the Met - Review

donohoe:

Berenice Abbott/Commerce Graphics and Metropolitan Museum of Art Photography After Dark, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, includes Berenice Abbott’s “Nightview, New York,” from 1932.

Source: ‘Night Vision - Photography After Dark,’ at the Met - Review

Tom Scocca on Bill Cunningham New York, which opens at Film Forum tonight.