How a Brooklyn band goes country

Blame Nirvana: The 40 Weirdest Post-‘Nevermind’ Major-Label Albums

Lots of New York-based artists featured in this list including Cell, Sammy, Mercury Rev and more.

What is your favorite Nirvana-influenced major album?

Tags: music New York

Melanie Fiona - “Wrong Side of a Love Song” (Live @ Fuse Studios)

Just one of the artists featured in Streets of Your Town, J. Edward Keyes’ weekly guide to concerts. This week: Leonard Cohen, Sufjan Stevens, T.I., and more are performing!

Finding Ginger Baker: First-time filmmaker Jay Bulger talks to our own J. Gabriel Boylan about his journey into the heart of rock & roll darkness.
Check out the documentary, it’s screening at Film Forum!

Finding Ginger Baker: First-time filmmaker Jay Bulger talks to our own J. Gabriel Boylan about his journey into the heart of rock & roll darkness.

Check out the documentary, it’s screening at Film Forum!

“We grew up going to raves and going to punk shows and feeding off that energy, and all of a sudden that energy didn’t exist anymore. There was no trouble going on.” - Vivian Host, of Trouble & Bass, on what they wanted for New York’s night scene. Read more.

“We grew up going to raves and going to punk shows and feeding off that energy, and all of a sudden that energy didn’t exist anymore. There was no trouble going on.” - Vivian Host, of Trouble & Bass, on what they wanted for New York’s night scene. Read more.

Public Enemy - “Fight the Power” (Live)

Public Enemy plays July 30 at Wingate Park. Check out more concerts in Streets of Your Town, our guide to the week’s shows.


Though “Bleecker Bob” is identified with some of the great names of rock and roll through the decades, and especially downtown movements from the Village’s folk scene through punk, new wave and alternative music, now, time is finally catching up with the oldest record store in the Village.
There are cracks in the black and white linoleum floor. Dust gathers on Bob’s collection of art deco clocks, many of which have stopped. Though the landlord of their building on West Third Street has been good to Bob over the years, he’s finally putting the rent up in line with prices in the area. Bleecker Bob’s is getting priced out.

'For the Records': Capital presents a documentary about the final days of Bleecker Bob's

Though “Bleecker Bob” is identified with some of the great names of rock and roll through the decades, and especially downtown movements from the Village’s folk scene through punk, new wave and alternative music, now, time is finally catching up with the oldest record store in the Village.

There are cracks in the black and white linoleum floor. Dust gathers on Bob’s collection of art deco clocks, many of which have stopped. Though the landlord of their building on West Third Street has been good to Bob over the years, he’s finally putting the rent up in line with prices in the area. Bleecker Bob’s is getting priced out.

'For the Records': Capital presents a documentary about the final days of Bleecker Bob's

Here is a video of Mayor Bloomberg playing the harmonica during the ‘Make Music New York’ festival.

HAPPY FRIDAY.

Streets of Your Town: This week’s concerts, with Metallica, Das Racist, Ani DiFranco, and more

In recent years, it could be argued that Metallica's relentless eclecticism has been their downfall. This feels somewhat cruel to say. Heavy metal is a genre that can at times be preposterously dogmatic, and the natural impulse is to praise any band—particularly one as revered and pioneering as Metallica—that dares defy its Code of Conduct with a bit of arty impulsiveness. The trouble is, Metallica's impulses haven't always been the right ones (and you can cue up any section of last year's brain-breaking collaboration with Lou Reed at random for proof). So be thankful, then for Orion Music + More (June 23 & 24, Bader Field, N.J.), where the group’s adventurousness finds a more productive output. Curated by the band, the two-day event isn’t wanting for metal—the chilling, Satanic Ghost, art-metallers Baroness, and too-fast-too-furious Liturgy all will make appearances. But they’re counterbalanced by the sunny California pop of Best Coast, Gary Clark Jr.'s blistering blues, Eric Church's rollicking country, and psych-folk mystic Roky Erickson. And lest they feel neglected, there’s even a little something for the purists: Metallica will close both nights by running through a classic album in its entirety. On  Saturday, they’ll be performing 1984’s Ride the Lightning, and on Sunday, their eponymous 1991 album, commonly referred to as “the Black album.” Whether or not they will be joined onstage by Terry Riley or members of Arcade Fire remains to be seen.

Read more!

Streets of Your Town: This week’s concerts, with Metallica, Das Racist, Ani DiFranco, and more

In recent years, it could be argued that Metallica's relentless eclecticism has been their downfall. This feels somewhat cruel to say. Heavy metal is a genre that can at times be preposterously dogmatic, and the natural impulse is to praise any band—particularly one as revered and pioneering as Metallica—that dares defy its Code of Conduct with a bit of arty impulsiveness. The trouble is, Metallica's impulses haven't always been the right ones (and you can cue up any section of last year's brain-breaking collaboration with Lou Reed at random for proof). So be thankful, then for Orion Music + More (June 23 & 24, Bader Field, N.J.), where the group’s adventurousness finds a more productive output. Curated by the band, the two-day event isn’t wanting for metal—the chilling, Satanic Ghost, art-metallers Baroness, and too-fast-too-furious Liturgy all will make appearances. But they’re counterbalanced by the sunny California pop of Best Coast, Gary Clark Jr.'s blistering blues, Eric Church's rollicking country, and psych-folk mystic Roky Erickson. And lest they feel neglected, there’s even a little something for the purists: Metallica will close both nights by running through a classic album in its entirety. On  Saturday, they’ll be performing 1984’s Ride the Lightning, and on Sunday, their eponymous 1991 album, commonly referred to as “the Black album.” Whether or not they will be joined onstage by Terry Riley or members of Arcade Fire remains to be seen.

Read more!

pitchfork:

Watch Zola Jesus perform at Manhattan’s Guggenheim Museum in the latest episode of Pitchfork.tv’s “+1”.

Good idea! You can also read Daphne Carr’s wonderful review of the show on Capital New York.

Before and after ‘Last Waltz’: What Levon Helm and, for a short while, The Band, stood for

While never rock gods on the order of their contemporaries, The Band stood—in some pure, yet often entirely cryptic way—for the least modish, most enduring values of the ’60s. What’s more, their last concert was the subject of Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz, widely regarded as the finest rock doc ever made. And, for what it’s worth, a singularly dismal acknowledgement that everything The Band stood for was over, or at least had been pushed aside by self-interest, cynicism, and incredulity.

With the exception of Helm, all of its members hailed from Canada. That makes it either really easy or profoundly difficult to call The Band “outsiders,” since they so rooted themselves in America’s past, or at least a highly abstracted, symbolic version of it that was as much about internal geography as real highways and byways. Their mentor Dylan had begun his career emulating Woody Guthrie’s angry train-hopping, had thrown his id out into the world with abandon in his electric phase, and then reinvented his relationship with the tradition after a 1966 motorcycle crash.

The Band, almost more than Dylan himself, understood how the past could be rendered timeless, at once light and mighty. They themselves were an idea about how music could exist, not kids with a dream; their songs were as specific, and without direction, as the listener needed them to be. This was a finely curated innerspace of America, stretching back generations, at a time when LSD had reduced introspection to a pitched, lawless battle against the rules and norms of Kantian mom and dad.

- Bethlehem Shoals for Capital New York

rickycamilleri:

CANT. STOP. LISTENING. 

Wild - Screaming Females

Capital New York-approved band in a Capital New York-approved video.

Didn’t get tickets to see Pulp at Radio City Music Hall this week? Don’t worry, there are other shows to see! And you can catch Pulp on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” tonight on NBC (or on your computer screen the next morning, like the rest of us).

Didn’t get tickets to see Pulp at Radio City Music Hall this week? Don’t worry, there are other shows to see! And you can catch Pulp on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” tonight on NBC (or on your computer screen the next morning, like the rest of us).


She is already beyond some of the identity branding black women have to do to make it in pop: she is already done with “the Black Barbie,” but she still gets shine from saying “I am the female Weezy.” Other women have done the simile before—Yo Yo with Ice Cube, Lil Kim with Biggie, Remy Ma with Big Pun—but Minaj is already there on an artistic level. Her flow, including the corny hashtag raps and the growls and all the other forms of play that make her simultaneously so old school and so fresh, have already shifted the zeitgeist and inspired a new generation of pop lovers in one short year. Now it’s time for her to figure out how to step up to sound like she what she says on the album’s third track: “I Am Your Leader.”

It’s 2012 and it’s Nicki Minaj’s world to make, but this album is not going to make it | by Daphne Carr | Capital New York

She is already beyond some of the identity branding black women have to do to make it in pop: she is already done with “the Black Barbie,” but she still gets shine from saying “I am the female Weezy.” Other women have done the simile before—Yo Yo with Ice Cube, Lil Kim with Biggie, Remy Ma with Big Pun—but Minaj is already there on an artistic level. Her flow, including the corny hashtag raps and the growls and all the other forms of play that make her simultaneously so old school and so fresh, have already shifted the zeitgeist and inspired a new generation of pop lovers in one short year. Now it’s time for her to figure out how to step up to sound like she what she says on the album’s third track: “I Am Your Leader.”

It’s 2012 and it’s Nicki Minaj’s world to make, but this album is not going to make it | by Daphne Carr | Capital New York