JFK: Um, did you really all have hourglass figures?
 Mom: Yep, we really did. We wore body-hugging skirts, blouses with bows at the neck, and suits, if we could afford them. Women, even secretaries, wore suits. But mostly skirts and blouses and dresses. It was not very comfortable, especially sitting in those skirts. They would ride up, of course. But we all dressed very formally, always. Men: suit and tie, and that’s a proper suit, no jackets and slacks. Women: girdle, stockings, high heels, always. No sneakers to walk to work; we would not have been caught dead in them.
JFK: What was the office environment like?
Mom: Sexual overtones were in the air, like breathing. It was the culture, not just at Playboy. Women were objects of desire, period. However, this was the office of a highly successful magazine and we were expected to work well and professionally and we all did. There were, as I remember, five of us, including the head secretary. We sat in a line at our desks in a large room and the ad men’s offices opened behind us. Each ad man had a small office, but with a window overlooking Park Avenue, a nice desk, chairs for visitors. We each worked for two or three ad men directly. There was flirting, innuendo, double entendre all the time, but rarely was it serious. It became serious only if the woman allowed it in the work place and this hardly ever happened. Not at Playboy while I was there, but certainly somewhere, and abortions were illegal. I knew one young woman who flew from New York City to Mexico for one.

Entertainment for Women | A daughter interviews her mother about working for Playboy in the ’60sby Jessica Francis Kane | The Morning News

JFK: Um, did you really all have hourglass figures?

Mom: Yep, we really did. We wore body-hugging skirts, blouses with bows at the neck, and suits, if we could afford them. Women, even secretaries, wore suits. But mostly skirts and blouses and dresses. It was not very comfortable, especially sitting in those skirts. They would ride up, of course. But we all dressed very formally, always. Men: suit and tie, and that’s a proper suit, no jackets and slacks. Women: girdle, stockings, high heels, always. No sneakers to walk to work; we would not have been caught dead in them.

JFK: What was the office environment like?

Mom: Sexual overtones were in the air, like breathing. It was the culture, not just at Playboy. Women were objects of desire, period. However, this was the office of a highly successful magazine and we were expected to work well and professionally and we all did. There were, as I remember, five of us, including the head secretary. We sat in a line at our desks in a large room and the ad men’s offices opened behind us. Each ad man had a small office, but with a window overlooking Park Avenue, a nice desk, chairs for visitors. We each worked for two or three ad men directly. There was flirting, innuendo, double entendre all the time, but rarely was it serious. It became serious only if the woman allowed it in the work place and this hardly ever happened. Not at Playboy while I was there, but certainly somewhere, and abortions were illegal. I knew one young woman who flew from New York City to Mexico for one.

Entertainment for Women | A daughter interviews her mother about working for Playboy in the ’60s
by Jessica Francis Kane | The Morning News


Your insomnia’s buzzing. It’s June 30, 1987. 3 a.m. No shot at sleep, no shot at sex. You’re up, awake, obsessing over the sudden dip in Wally Backman’s batting average or what the Yankees are going to do about their third starter. Normal, nightly stuff for a New York sports fan. Then you get pensive. About why the Knicks suck; and why the Rangers suck; and why the Jets and the Giants suck even if it’s the wrong season to think about their suckitude. You want to talk it all out. No, you need to talk it all out. But there’s no one there to listen. You can fix this. HoJo’s stroke, Rasmussen’s slider — well, OK, maybe not the Knicks. You’re alone in the world with all this knowledge until, suddenly, you are not.
On July 1, 1987, WFAN, a 24-hour sports talk radio station, broadcasting out of a sub-basement in Queens, hit the air. It didn’t come out of nowhere, exactly. The format had been evolving. Marty Glickman, long-ago voice of the Knicks and Giants, first took questions on air in the 1940s at New York’s WHN. He listened to calls and relayed them to his audience since the technology didn’t yet exist to patch in a caller. Howard Cosell advanced the genre in the ’50s by openly chastising coaches during broadcasts. In the ’60s, Bill Mazer pioneered the current sports talk template, bantering with callers, letting their voices be heard, and then, in the ’70s, John Sterling crystallized it by lambasting them. Enterprise Radio attempted all-sports programming in 1981. They went out of business after nine months.

The Sound and the Fury: The fall and rise of the first all-sports talk station, WFAN
By Alex French and Howie Kahn on Grantland

Your insomnia’s buzzing. It’s June 30, 1987. 3 a.m. No shot at sleep, no shot at sex. You’re up, awake, obsessing over the sudden dip in Wally Backman’s batting average or what the Yankees are going to do about their third starter. Normal, nightly stuff for a New York sports fan. Then you get pensive. About why the Knicks suck; and why the Rangers suck; and why the Jets and the Giants suck even if it’s the wrong season to think about their suckitude. You want to talk it all out. No, you need to talk it all out. But there’s no one there to listen. You can fix this. HoJo’s stroke, Rasmussen’s slider — well, OK, maybe not the Knicks. You’re alone in the world with all this knowledge until, suddenly, you are not.

On July 1, 1987, WFAN, a 24-hour sports talk radio station, broadcasting out of a sub-basement in Queens, hit the air. It didn’t come out of nowhere, exactly. The format had been evolving. Marty Glickman, long-ago voice of the Knicks and Giants, first took questions on air in the 1940s at New York’s WHN. He listened to calls and relayed them to his audience since the technology didn’t yet exist to patch in a caller. Howard Cosell advanced the genre in the ’50s by openly chastising coaches during broadcasts. In the ’60s, Bill Mazer pioneered the current sports talk template, bantering with callers, letting their voices be heard, and then, in the ’70s, John Sterling crystallized it by lambasting them. Enterprise Radio attempted all-sports programming in 1981. They went out of business after nine months.

The Sound and the Fury: The fall and rise of the first all-sports talk station, WFAN

By Alex French and Howie Kahn on Grantland


Sorkin, it is increasingly clear, is less interested in vagaries of cable news than he is in telling us how the country should be as a whole, and is busy fantasizing television as some sort of magic wand that might just be able to cast a curing spell on us. Cable’s role in the show is not just a funhouse mirror of our behavior as voters and political theater in Washington; it’s bigger.
Alas, in Sorkin’s world the Internet, the driving force behind everything on cable, remains the domain of a guy named Vinny in his efficiency apartment, when in fact it’s the phenomenon that has both dismantled and reconstructed the media in its entirety, and cable news particularly. (The Internet, Fox News, and “The Daily Show,” three of the most powerful forces in terms of how we consume media and understand democracy in the last five years, have yet to factor at all in “The Newsroom.”)

Glynnis MacNicol on the latest “Newsroom.”

Sorkin, it is increasingly clear, is less interested in vagaries of cable news than he is in telling us how the country should be as a whole, and is busy fantasizing television as some sort of magic wand that might just be able to cast a curing spell on us. Cable’s role in the show is not just a funhouse mirror of our behavior as voters and political theater in Washington; it’s bigger.

Alas, in Sorkin’s world the Internet, the driving force behind everything on cable, remains the domain of a guy named Vinny in his efficiency apartment, when in fact it’s the phenomenon that has both dismantled and reconstructed the media in its entirety, and cable news particularly. (The Internet, Fox News, and “The Daily Show,” three of the most powerful forces in terms of how we consume media and understand democracy in the last five years, have yet to factor at all in “The Newsroom.”)

Glynnis MacNicol on the latest “Newsroom.”

The Anthony Weiner comeback tour? A Democrat, based in D.C., replied as follows, via Google Chat: "Crickets." 

The Anthony Weiner comeback tour? A Democrat, based in D.C., replied as follows, via Google Chat: "Crickets." 


"THERE WAS A GAP…THERE WAS SOMETHING MISSING.”  
That was Jason Parham's feeling when he decided to start a new literary magazine, Spook.
“I love The New Yorker, I love Harper’s, and these are very great established literary magazines, and we’re so often on the periphery.” 
The “we” he’s referring to are African American, Latino, and other writers of color. 
Spook is his answer.

Brand new magazine ‘Spook’ seeks to even the literary fieldby Melissa Smith | Capital New York

"THERE WAS A GAP…THERE WAS SOMETHING MISSING.” 

That was Jason Parham's feeling when he decided to start a new literary magazine, Spook.

“I love The New Yorker, I love Harper’s, and these are very great established literary magazines, and we’re so often on the periphery.” 

The “we” he’s referring to are African American, Latino, and other writers of color. 

Spook is his answer.

Brand new magazine ‘Spook’ seeks to even the literary field
by Melissa Smith | Capital New York

"This isn’t the nerds versus the jocks. This is the killers versus the poets."

— Steven Boone on “The Last of Us,” and other violent video games that leave nothing to the imagination

"He lunged at me like a raging bull." - The photographer shoved by Alec Baldwin speaks out.

Goodbye, Sue Simmons! "For our own salute, we offer a Sue Simmons clip that’s a favorite around here—her 1985 interview with Kate Bush, tied to her tour for the album Hounds of Love… it’s equal parts infuriating, charming, lazily executed and easy to watch and so seems to capture both what Simmons’ harshest critics and most devoted fans have seen in her these last three decades.”

For the most part, even when she’s being a little nasty, there’s something likable, and distinctly old New York about it, isn’t there?” See what you think.

newschallenge:

Photo Credit: Flickr user Koen Vereeken

The Knight News Challenge is being offered three times this year, in short, focused rounds to better mirror the pace of innovation. Winners of Round 1, which focused on networks, will be announced June 18. Here, Journalism and Media Innovation…

Great opportunity for media organizations and creative individuals. Get to it!

(Source: newschallenge1)

Tags: media

"Speaking of which: The news that Bar Rafaeli topped Maxim's “HOT 100” list has no legs, but lots of leg, and a bare bottom, and a pretty face. A shot of Rafaeli lying nude on the beach is only tenuously connected to any of the material inside: a guide to local beaches and a “SEEN & HEARD” item in which Rafaeli is photographed with a pilot on a flight to Los Angeles. Pretty skimpy!” - Tom McGeveran in The Front, his daily assessment of New York’s tabloids.

"Speaking of which: The news that Bar Rafaeli topped Maxim's “HOT 100” list has no legs, but lots of leg, and a bare bottom, and a pretty face. A shot of Rafaeli lying nude on the beach is only tenuously connected to any of the material inside: a guide to local beaches and a “SEEN & HEARD” item in which Rafaeli is photographed with a pilot on a flight to Los Angeles. Pretty skimpy!” - Tom McGeveran in The Front, his daily assessment of New York’s tabloids.

The New York Times discovers the Power List

Tags: media

Real talk from Tom McGeveran on the John Travolta news:

New York Post: The latest news about John Travolta is that two more people are saying he’s gay. There is a history of this stretching back decades, which depending on your point of view makes it either more likely to be true (where there’s smoke, lots and lots of smoke …) or less likely (there’s a market for shipping “Travolta is gay” material, and relatively little risk involved). And, yes, the real news is that two male masseurs have accused Travolta of touching them inappropriately or demanding sex acts from them.
That’s news on its own, but if the masseuses had been women, the news would have been the fact that he is accused of assault. The most newsworthy element of the story, given that the plaintiffs in the recent lawsuit are men, is that if they’re telling the truth, Travolta’s gay.

Real talk from Tom McGeveran on the John Travolta news:

New York Post: The latest news about John Travolta is that two more people are saying he’s gay. There is a history of this stretching back decades, which depending on your point of view makes it either more likely to be true (where there’s smoke, lots and lots of smoke …) or less likely (there’s a market for shipping “Travolta is gay” material, and relatively little risk involved). And, yes, the real news is that two male masseurs have accused Travolta of touching them inappropriately or demanding sex acts from them.

That’s news on its own, but if the masseuses had been women, the news would have been the fact that he is accused of assault. The most newsworthy element of the story, given that the plaintiffs in the recent lawsuit are men, is that if they’re telling the truth, Travolta’s gay.


Windolf, 48, is a recent addition to the group of people who are behind Punch!, a new iPad publication that is, for now, mostly a sparsely populated “bookshelf” of interactive games and visuals and other little graphic toys on the broad themes of contemporary politics and pop culture news. (It’s free at the App Store, here.)
"The web is increasingly feeling like noise and bother," he said. "I mean I read it, all day. But I don’t always feel so good afterward." 
What he sees in Punch! is the possibility of creating a successor to Spy, the seminal late-’80s monthly-magazine brainchild of Kurt Andersen and Graydon Carter that was a turning point in the culture of magazine-making and reading. It was a relatively short-lived, money-losing proposition that, in the final stages of its growth, scattered its seed across Manhattan like some kind of plucked dandelion, sprouting nasty bits of yellow everywhere it landed.
"On the other hand, I used to read Spy and not feel great afterward, either,” he said. “That’s something people forget.”

The making of a brand-new iPad magazine that’s already sick of the Internet | by Tom McGeveran | Capital New York

Windolf, 48, is a recent addition to the group of people who are behind Punch!, a new iPad publication that is, for now, mostly a sparsely populated “bookshelf” of interactive games and visuals and other little graphic toys on the broad themes of contemporary politics and pop culture news. (It’s free at the App Store, here.)

"The web is increasingly feeling like noise and bother," he said. "I mean I read it, all day. But I don’t always feel so good afterward." 

What he sees in Punch! is the possibility of creating a successor to Spy, the seminal late-’80s monthly-magazine brainchild of Kurt Andersen and Graydon Carter that was a turning point in the culture of magazine-making and reading. It was a relatively short-lived, money-losing proposition that, in the final stages of its growth, scattered its seed across Manhattan like some kind of plucked dandelion, sprouting nasty bits of yellow everywhere it landed.

"On the other hand, I used to read Spy and not feel great afterward, either,” he said. “That’s something people forget.”

The making of a brand-new iPad magazine that’s already sick of the Internet | by Tom McGeveran | Capital New York

Terry McDonnell, editor of Sports Illustrated, at last night’s National Magazine Awards ceremony:

"I think that being an editor right now is the most interesting time to be an editor because of all the possibilities that are coming. When the challenge is basically, ‘change, or go home,’ my response to that is, no fear. Bring it.
"I really like this work. I really like your work," he continued. "I like how it’s fluid, and I like how it’s nuanced, and I like how it’s ironic, and I like how it has so much craft in it, and it has its own tides, it’s own seasons, and it has bogeymen, and maybe it even has magic sometimes when it all comes together. … I think all of you know all of that, and you like that, too."

Read more at Capital New York

Terry McDonnell, editor of Sports Illustrated, at last night’s National Magazine Awards ceremony:

"I think that being an editor right now is the most interesting time to be an editor because of all the possibilities that are coming. When the challenge is basically, ‘change, or go home,’ my response to that is, no fear. Bring it.

"I really like this work. I really like your work," he continued. "I like how it’s fluid, and I like how it’s nuanced, and I like how it’s ironic, and I like how it has so much craft in it, and it has its own tides, it’s own seasons, and it has bogeymen, and maybe it even has magic sometimes when it all comes together. … I think all of you know all of that, and you like that, too."

Read more at Capital New York

"HuffPost is my baby," she said. “I feel that it’s a long time since it played it’s first cute kitten video, and here it is now seven years later winning a Pulitzer.”