"THERE WAS A GAP…THERE WAS SOMETHING MISSING.”  
That was Jason Parham's feeling when he decided to start a new literary magazine, Spook.
“I love The New Yorker, I love Harper’s, and these are very great established literary magazines, and we’re so often on the periphery.” 
The “we” he’s referring to are African American, Latino, and other writers of color. 
Spook is his answer.

Brand new magazine ‘Spook’ seeks to even the literary fieldby Melissa Smith | Capital New York

"THERE WAS A GAP…THERE WAS SOMETHING MISSING.” 

That was Jason Parham's feeling when he decided to start a new literary magazine, Spook.

“I love The New Yorker, I love Harper’s, and these are very great established literary magazines, and we’re so often on the periphery.” 

The “we” he’s referring to are African American, Latino, and other writers of color. 

Spook is his answer.

Brand new magazine ‘Spook’ seeks to even the literary field
by Melissa Smith | Capital New York


Windolf, 48, is a recent addition to the group of people who are behind Punch!, a new iPad publication that is, for now, mostly a sparsely populated “bookshelf” of interactive games and visuals and other little graphic toys on the broad themes of contemporary politics and pop culture news. (It’s free at the App Store, here.)
"The web is increasingly feeling like noise and bother," he said. "I mean I read it, all day. But I don’t always feel so good afterward." 
What he sees in Punch! is the possibility of creating a successor to Spy, the seminal late-’80s monthly-magazine brainchild of Kurt Andersen and Graydon Carter that was a turning point in the culture of magazine-making and reading. It was a relatively short-lived, money-losing proposition that, in the final stages of its growth, scattered its seed across Manhattan like some kind of plucked dandelion, sprouting nasty bits of yellow everywhere it landed.
"On the other hand, I used to read Spy and not feel great afterward, either,” he said. “That’s something people forget.”

The making of a brand-new iPad magazine that’s already sick of the Internet | by Tom McGeveran | Capital New York

Windolf, 48, is a recent addition to the group of people who are behind Punch!, a new iPad publication that is, for now, mostly a sparsely populated “bookshelf” of interactive games and visuals and other little graphic toys on the broad themes of contemporary politics and pop culture news. (It’s free at the App Store, here.)

"The web is increasingly feeling like noise and bother," he said. "I mean I read it, all day. But I don’t always feel so good afterward." 

What he sees in Punch! is the possibility of creating a successor to Spy, the seminal late-’80s monthly-magazine brainchild of Kurt Andersen and Graydon Carter that was a turning point in the culture of magazine-making and reading. It was a relatively short-lived, money-losing proposition that, in the final stages of its growth, scattered its seed across Manhattan like some kind of plucked dandelion, sprouting nasty bits of yellow everywhere it landed.

"On the other hand, I used to read Spy and not feel great afterward, either,” he said. “That’s something people forget.”

The making of a brand-new iPad magazine that’s already sick of the Internet | by Tom McGeveran | Capital New York

azipaybarah:

theschnitzel:

“Boss”

how young is too young for the New Yorker and Bruce Spingsteen?

Start ‘em early.

Come hither looks

"So when we put women on the cover, it must be only be for serious profiles? Okay, then I could use some help with suggestions. We love up-and-comers, but they don’t sell magazines if they don’t already have a relatively high profile and are leading a company people want to read about. For instance, Carol Bartz is a great CEO, but I just don’t think a ‘wither Yahoo’ cover would work right now. I know this sounds like a chicken-and-egg situation, but the time is long gone since people needed magazine covers to become famous. Witness our Julia Allison cover, which was entirely about her accomplishments in self-promotion, which we applauded as a key 21st Century skill. But you don’t like that one because she has ‘come hither looks.’"

- Chris Anderson, editor of Wired, responding to the controversy over the magazine’s recent cover.

Capital pal Joe Pompeo put together this great collection of 2010 mag covers: 8 Picks for The Best Magazine Cover of The Past Year
As infrastructure geeks, this one is our favorite.

Capital pal Joe Pompeo put together this great collection of 2010 mag covers: 8 Picks for The Best Magazine Cover of The Past Year

As infrastructure geeks, this one is our favorite.