"Part of what made comics popular in the first place around World War II, what made them what they are, was that they were some of the first consumer goods priced to be available to kids—10 cents, 12 cents—a kid could buy them. Anything that can get comics into the hands of kids, that can get comics to where kids live, is going to be very, very important—and digital comics are a huge part of that."

Fred Van Lente, co-founder of Evil Twin Comics and co-author of The Comic Book History of Comics on the digital future of comics. 

"Hello, Mr. Mayor: Tech workers carry… tech tools. And many of them don’t have — or want — cars, so they ride the subway. A big quality-of-life point is to work or play on your commute."

— Nicole Gelinas in the New York Post. She says that the Bloomberg administration’s high-profile effort to grow New York City’s tech sector is threatened by a raise in subway crime, particularly the theft of “tech stuff” like iPads and iPhones.


Windolf, 48, is a recent addition to the group of people who are behind Punch!, a new iPad publication that is, for now, mostly a sparsely populated “bookshelf” of interactive games and visuals and other little graphic toys on the broad themes of contemporary politics and pop culture news. (It’s free at the App Store, here.)
"The web is increasingly feeling like noise and bother," he said. "I mean I read it, all day. But I don’t always feel so good afterward." 
What he sees in Punch! is the possibility of creating a successor to Spy, the seminal late-’80s monthly-magazine brainchild of Kurt Andersen and Graydon Carter that was a turning point in the culture of magazine-making and reading. It was a relatively short-lived, money-losing proposition that, in the final stages of its growth, scattered its seed across Manhattan like some kind of plucked dandelion, sprouting nasty bits of yellow everywhere it landed.
"On the other hand, I used to read Spy and not feel great afterward, either,” he said. “That’s something people forget.”

The making of a brand-new iPad magazine that’s already sick of the Internet | by Tom McGeveran | Capital New York

Windolf, 48, is a recent addition to the group of people who are behind Punch!, a new iPad publication that is, for now, mostly a sparsely populated “bookshelf” of interactive games and visuals and other little graphic toys on the broad themes of contemporary politics and pop culture news. (It’s free at the App Store, here.)

"The web is increasingly feeling like noise and bother," he said. "I mean I read it, all day. But I don’t always feel so good afterward." 

What he sees in Punch! is the possibility of creating a successor to Spy, the seminal late-’80s monthly-magazine brainchild of Kurt Andersen and Graydon Carter that was a turning point in the culture of magazine-making and reading. It was a relatively short-lived, money-losing proposition that, in the final stages of its growth, scattered its seed across Manhattan like some kind of plucked dandelion, sprouting nasty bits of yellow everywhere it landed.

"On the other hand, I used to read Spy and not feel great afterward, either,” he said. “That’s something people forget.”

The making of a brand-new iPad magazine that’s already sick of the Internet | by Tom McGeveran | Capital New York

Radar founder Maer Roshan and friends launch satirical iPad appazine, ‘Punch!’

Tags: media iPad