The Sunday before, NBC analyst Cris Collinsworth had mentioned on air that the Giants organization was disappointed in their second-round draft pick’s work ethic. Network analysts like Collinsworth usually don’t make stuff up out of thin air; it seemed likely that this tidbit was leaked to him deliberately in a pregame production meeting by a high-ranking coach or player.
This was all pointedly confirmed in Wednesday’s New York Post by Victor Cruz, who channeled his inner Bull Durham manager and said Randle couldn’t continue to “lollygag.”
Eli Manning was a little gentler but hit the same notes, saying, “He’s young and he’s trying to figure out what it takes to compete and get mentally and physically ready for upcoming games.”
So I asked Randle about the whole thing, and his response was pretty generic: “It takes a lot to bother me. I just stay focused, and control what I can control.”
For the entirety of our three-minute interview, Randle stood with his arms folded across his chest, looking down and making solid eye contact with me with minimal gesticulation or voice modulation. It actually did seem like it would take a lot bother him; his affect in the interview was languid, much like his manner on the field.

'Just stay focused': Maybe Rueben Randle doesn't need to get worked up by Greg Hanlon for Capital New York

The Sunday before, NBC analyst Cris Collinsworth had mentioned on air that the Giants organization was disappointed in their second-round draft pick’s work ethic. Network analysts like Collinsworth usually don’t make stuff up out of thin air; it seemed likely that this tidbit was leaked to him deliberately in a pregame production meeting by a high-ranking coach or player.

This was all pointedly confirmed in Wednesday’s New York Post by Victor Cruz, who channeled his inner Bull Durham manager and said Randle couldn’t continue to “lollygag.”

Eli Manning was a little gentler but hit the same notes, saying, “He’s young and he’s trying to figure out what it takes to compete and get mentally and physically ready for upcoming games.”

So I asked Randle about the whole thing, and his response was pretty generic: “It takes a lot to bother me. I just stay focused, and control what I can control.”

For the entirety of our three-minute interview, Randle stood with his arms folded across his chest, looking down and making solid eye contact with me with minimal gesticulation or voice modulation. It actually did seem like it would take a lot bother him; his affect in the interview was languid, much like his manner on the field.

'Just stay focused': Maybe Rueben Randle doesn't need to get worked up by Greg Hanlon for Capital New York


Forget the Hall of Fame. It’s the myth-making treatment of NFL Films that turns the men of pro football into legends. And tonight is Tom Coughlin’s official bronzing.
Coughlin is the subject of tonight’s installment of “A Football Life,” the NFL Network’s Emmy-winning, hour-long documentary series.
This will be enjoyable to Giants fans because it can’t not be: Seeing your team celebrated on an NFL Films production and seeing your team celebrate on the field are one and the same. Plus, the show puts forth Coughlin as a paragon of an old-school athletic morality, for which virtue isn’t so much found in winning, as in the commitment and self-sacrifice that goes into it. 
This notion of Coughlin as a man of integrity dovetails with the Giants’ brand, which is awash with nostalgia for a bygone era when men were men, and doing the right thing was simple, but not easy. That idea was reinforced two Sundays ago, when Coughlin reacted angrily to Tampa Bay’s attempts to hit Eli Manning, even after the game had been decided. Coughlin, offended on principle, stormed onto the field to find Tampa’s upstart coach, Greg Schiano, and lecture him about football’s unwritten rules. Schiano didn’t do things the right way, and Coughlin couldn’t abide.

Greg Hanlon in his review of NFL Films’ gauzy, legend treatment of Giants coach Tom Coughlin

Forget the Hall of Fame. It’s the myth-making treatment of NFL Films that turns the men of pro football into legends. And tonight is Tom Coughlin’s official bronzing.

Coughlin is the subject of tonight’s installment of “A Football Life,” the NFL Network’s Emmy-winning, hour-long documentary series.

This will be enjoyable to Giants fans because it can’t not be: Seeing your team celebrated on an NFL Films production and seeing your team celebrate on the field are one and the same. Plus, the show puts forth Coughlin as a paragon of an old-school athletic morality, for which virtue isn’t so much found in winning, as in the commitment and self-sacrifice that goes into it. 

This notion of Coughlin as a man of integrity dovetails with the Giants’ brand, which is awash with nostalgia for a bygone era when men were men, and doing the right thing was simple, but not easy. That idea was reinforced two Sundays ago, when Coughlin reacted angrily to Tampa Bay’s attempts to hit Eli Manning, even after the game had been decided. Coughlin, offended on principle, stormed onto the field to find Tampa’s upstart coach, Greg Schiano, and lecture him about football’s unwritten rules. Schiano didn’t do things the right way, and Coughlin couldn’t abide.

Greg Hanlon in his review of NFL Films’ gauzy, legend treatment of Giants coach Tom Coughlin

(Source: inothernews)

David Carr’s dog, preparing for the Super Bowl. (via)
You can prepare by reading Greg Hanlon on Bill Parcells, the coach who deserves credit from both teams, and the entire football league, for what he has done for the sport. (Quotes from Tuna on his football philosophy beyond the click).

David Carr’s dog, preparing for the Super Bowl. (via)

You can prepare by reading Greg Hanlon on Bill Parcells, the coach who deserves credit from both teams, and the entire football league, for what he has done for the sport. (Quotes from Tuna on his football philosophy beyond the click).

boston:

Four years later, many changes for Patriots, Giants
- Of the 106 players who were on the active rosters for the Giants and Patriots in the Super Bowl on Feb. 3, 2008, only 23 are still employed with the same team today.

Some fascinating stats within.

boston:

Four years later, many changes for Patriots, Giants

- Of the 106 players who were on the active rosters for the Giants and Patriots in the Super Bowl on Feb. 3, 2008, only 23 are still employed with the same team today.

Some fascinating stats within.

(via sportsnetny)

Even David Harris, star Jets linebacker, misses sometimes, but he’ll be back, and it will probably hurt

“With all the work he put in rehabbing, I saw a different David  Harris after that,” said his childhood friend and teammate at Michigan.  “He came out with an explosiveness I’d  never seen from him.  We started calling him ‘The Black Hammer’—it was  an old ‘70s Blaxploitation vibe I wanted to give him.  He wasn’t just  tackling people.  He was hitting people violently.”
With the Jets, his nickname is more politically correct: “The Hit Man.”

Even David Harris, star Jets linebacker, misses sometimes, but he’ll be back, and it will probably hurt

“With all the work he put in rehabbing, I saw a different David Harris after that,” said his childhood friend and teammate at Michigan. “He came out with an explosiveness I’d never seen from him. We started calling him ‘The Black Hammer’—it was an old ‘70s Blaxploitation vibe I wanted to give him. He wasn’t just tackling people. He was hitting people violently.”

With the Jets, his nickname is more politically correct: “The Hit Man.”

"If you want a team that has a competitive attitude and to have that dog mentality, sometimes you have to let them be that dog. Everything can’t be controlled. And right now, everything is controlled within this organization."

Giants safety Antrel Rolle in the first edition of our “Roster” column. Each time the Giants or Jets play a game, Capital New York’s Greg Hanlon will write about a home-team member who took part in it. This first post is about Rolle, who played safety in the Giants’ 28-14 loss to the Washington Redskins.

Does anyone feel bad for the N.F.L. owners right now? Capital New York’s co-editor Josh Benson and Sridhar Pappu, a journalist who wrote about the players’ union for the New York Times, discuss:

Josh: I don’t even think the owners are pretending  this is about getting by. Theoretically they could always use more money  to plow back into the league. Because who couldn’t use more money. But  their argument seems to come down to, The players have enough already. We’d like more.
It’s  sort of the same argument they use for those personal seat licenses,  which some people buy. And for the price of tickets in general.
Speaking  as a Jets fan who used to go to lots of home games and has long since  been priced out of going, I have a hard time sympathizing with that  reasoning.
Am I missing something?
Sridhar:  No, you’re not. The reason the N.F.L. Players’ Association has asked  for the league to open their books is essentially compel the owners at  least to try to explain why they need revenue back from the players.  Throughout this whole fight, the owners have never claimed they were  losing money or were in dire straits—as is the case with the NBA, which  did open its books to the union and which faces a lockout of its own.
This  business makes $9 billion annually. Remember, this was not a strike. It  was a lockout. The owners wanted more, and they figured they could keep  the players away from their livelihood until they got it.

Does anyone feel bad for the N.F.L. owners right now? Capital New York’s co-editor Josh Benson and Sridhar Pappu, a journalist who wrote about the players’ union for the New York Times, discuss:

Josh: I don’t even think the owners are pretending this is about getting by. Theoretically they could always use more money to plow back into the league. Because who couldn’t use more money. But their argument seems to come down to, The players have enough already. We’d like more.

It’s sort of the same argument they use for those personal seat licenses, which some people buy. And for the price of tickets in general.

Speaking as a Jets fan who used to go to lots of home games and has long since been priced out of going, I have a hard time sympathizing with that reasoning.

Am I missing something?

Sridhar: No, you’re not. The reason the N.F.L. Players’ Association has asked for the league to open their books is essentially compel the owners at least to try to explain why they need revenue back from the players. Throughout this whole fight, the owners have never claimed they were losing money or were in dire straits—as is the case with the NBA, which did open its books to the union and which faces a lockout of its own.

This business makes $9 billion annually. Remember, this was not a strike. It was a lockout. The owners wanted more, and they figured they could keep the players away from their livelihood until they got it.

Tags: NFL football

Greg Hanlon back in the Giants’ locker room.

Greg Hanlon, in the locker room and on the field:

Wauffle’s replacement, Robert Nunn, has preached a renewed emphasis on technique and “gap discipline” to a defensive-line unit that strayed from these fundamentals last year. That’s what Rocky Bernard, the Giants spherical and soft-spoken defensive tackle, told me when I approached him for an interview at his locker.

“With Wauffle it was more about ‘getting off, getting off, getting off,’” he said, describing an approach that valued attacking penetration above all else. “With Nunn, we’re not just getting off like a wild man anymore. We still have a gap, but we balanced up our stances a bit so we’re not shooting the gap as much. It’s more just staying in your gap when [blockers] are trying to cut us off, reach us and scoop us and stuff.”