"If he wants to take the plunge, Andrew will have to do more in the run-up to ’16 than his father did in the run-up to ’92. But he’s already built a durable enough profile to ensure that people are talking and thinking about a Cuomo presidential bid, without submitting to the rhythms of this election season, or to the short-term needs of his party."

— Steve Kornacki on why Andrew Cuomo isn’t playing along with his party in 2012.

As the nation’s most popular governor, Cuomo has the potential to be an especially productive surrogate for President Obama. He could appeal to white ethnics in swing states, or rally the social liberals who admire him for having been out ahead of his party (and his president) on same-sex marriage, or perhaps headline a few fund-raisers with the wealthy New York donors who have stocked his own campaign coffers and funded the super PAC-like group dedicated to running pro-Cuomo advertising.

Assuming he wants to do any of that.

Reid Pillifant reports for Capital New York

"Man, you got to make the motherfuckers do it," said Russell Simmons, on Michael Bloomberg and Andrew Cuomo’s spending on social programs. “They ain’t gonna do shit unless you make ‘em. That’s why we need your awareness.”
Read the story and see more photos of the event on Azi’s Flickr.

"Man, you got to make the motherfuckers do it," said Russell Simmons, on Michael Bloomberg and Andrew Cuomo’s spending on social programs. “They ain’t gonna do shit unless you make ‘em. That’s why we need your awareness.”

Read the story and see more photos of the event on Azi’s Flickr.

"I have been doing things and pursuing things that I would not if I were thinking about running for president."

Gov. Andrew Cuomo, on running for president and expecting his popularity to go down

In what one police official described as an “egregious abuse of power,” Cuomo’s top aide Larry Schwartz “coordinated” with Albany police officials to have an 11 p.m. curfew enforced at the demonstration, in Academy Park, which is controlled in part by the state and partially by the city.

Albany Mayor Jerry Jennings agreed, but his police officers resisted, fearing a flurry of trespass citations against otherwise peaceful protesters would hurt community relations. Albany County District Attorney P. David Soares, and lawyers for the city took a second look and decided charges wouldn’t stick and would be a waste of precious time and resources.

Same-sex marriage opponent wants Cuomo to take back his ‘anti-American’ comment

"It’s  one thing to disagree on an issue of public policy, but quite another  to question the patriotism of 150 million (or more) Americans," Rev.  Jason McGuire, who organized loud demonstrations near the Capitol against the bill before it passed, wrote in a letter  today. He ends it by saying, "Retract your comments and apologize to  the millions of New Yorkers and other proud Americans you have  offended."
It’s not likely to happen.

Same-sex marriage opponent wants Cuomo to take back his ‘anti-American’ comment

"It’s one thing to disagree on an issue of public policy, but quite another to question the patriotism of 150 million (or more) Americans," Rev. Jason McGuire, who organized loud demonstrations near the Capitol against the bill before it passed, wrote in a letter today. He ends it by saying, "Retract your comments and apologize to the millions of New Yorkers and other proud Americans you have offended."

It’s not likely to happen.

"

“You are an angel,” Weinstein gushed.

“That’s the first time anybody’s ever called him that,” Obama said.

"

Harvey Weinstein and Barack Obama talk about Andrew Cuomo, during a fund-raiser last night in Weinstein’s home. (via azipaybarah)

You read Mayor Bloomberg on unions in the New York Times this morning. Now you can learn about Andrew Cuomo’s take on labor over at Capital New York. He is closest to open war with NYSUT, the teachers union, and most accommodating to SEIU 1199. As for other unions in between? It depends on the season and the organization.

Throughout his campaign last year, Cuomo decried “the special interests”  that are mucking things up in Albany, but only when prompted admitted  that he was referring to PEF, CSEA, SEIU 1199 and NYSUT. He helped set  up a committee   of business leaders—and a private-sector-and-labor  coalition—to serve as a counterweight to their influence. And he has  since adopted different tactics for dealing with each of the  special-interest unions in question.

Read more at Capital New York ——->

You read Mayor Bloomberg on unions in the New York Times this morning. Now you can learn about Andrew Cuomo’s take on labor over at Capital New York. He is closest to open war with NYSUT, the teachers union, and most accommodating to SEIU 1199. As for other unions in between? It depends on the season and the organization.

Throughout his campaign last year, Cuomo decried “the special interests” that are mucking things up in Albany, but only when prompted admitted that he was referring to PEF, CSEA, SEIU 1199 and NYSUT. He helped set up a committee of business leaders—and a private-sector-and-labor coalition—to serve as a counterweight to their influence. And he has since adopted different tactics for dealing with each of the special-interest unions in question.

Read more at Capital New York ——->

Jimmy Vielkind on Cuomo’s inside-out approach to Albany.

The Metropolitan Transit Authority probably gets its fair  share of vitriol from New Yorkers, and then some. It’s an easy target: a  massive bureaucracy run by an unelected board whose structure, funding  and operations are not particularly well-understood by people who don’t  deal with transportation policy for a living. Also, most people don’t  like commuting.
All of which makes the M.T.A. a particularly inviting issue during  campaign season, when candidates, who will inevitably have to answer  questions about it, must find something to say that isn’t too nuanced  and conveys a politically appropriate level of anger, but makes a  limited number of promises about actually changing things, because the  fact is the M.T.A. is, at least, functioning.

The Metropolitan Transit Authority probably gets its fair share of vitriol from New Yorkers, and then some. It’s an easy target: a massive bureaucracy run by an unelected board whose structure, funding and operations are not particularly well-understood by people who don’t deal with transportation policy for a living. Also, most people don’t like commuting.

All of which makes the M.T.A. a particularly inviting issue during campaign season, when candidates, who will inevitably have to answer questions about it, must find something to say that isn’t too nuanced and conveys a politically appropriate level of anger, but makes a limited number of promises about actually changing things, because the fact is the M.T.A. is, at least, functioning.

“I’ve worked on the urban agenda all my life. All. My. Life,”- Andrew Cuomo.

“I’ve worked on the urban agenda all my life. All. My. Life,”- Andrew Cuomo.