Tom McGeveran on the New York Times, Baby Boomers, and identity crises 
"[G]enerations age, and change. Once, the Baby Boomers were the grown-up trendmakers, who the Times attended in the fascinated way it now covers the doings of parents who live in Park Slope (“an increasingly upscale neighborhood where the store was founded 39 years ago by a group of shaggy idealists inspired by the socially conscious ethos of the time.”)
Now, those Baby Boomers are the people who write in to “Metropolitan Diary.”
In one recent entry, a man goes to Starbucks and hears the person in front of him order what he hears as a “black guy.” He asks the attendant, a black barista, what that’s all about; the barista puts his finger to his temple in the shape of a gun and says “two shots.” He’s outraged. Then sometime later he orders a coffee with a shot of espresso in it and hears the barista call out “Red eye!” He puts it together. (To which all I can say is: Why are the sources of Metropolitan Diary?)”

Tom McGeveran on the New York Times, Baby Boomers, and identity crises

"[G]enerations age, and change. Once, the Baby Boomers were the grown-up trendmakers, who the Times attended in the fascinated way it now covers the doings of parents who live in Park Slope (“an increasingly upscale neighborhood where the store was founded 39 years ago by a group of shaggy idealists inspired by the socially conscious ethos of the time.”)

Now, those Baby Boomers are the people who write in to “Metropolitan Diary.”

In one recent entry, a man goes to Starbucks and hears the person in front of him order what he hears as a “black guy.” He asks the attendant, a black barista, what that’s all about; the barista puts his finger to his temple in the shape of a gun and says “two shots.” He’s outraged. Then sometime later he orders a coffee with a shot of espresso in it and hears the barista call out “Red eye!” He puts it together. (To which all I can say is: Why are the sources of Metropolitan Diary?)”