artsfortransit:

The re-vamped Central Ave/ M-line station in Bushwick re-opens today! Check out our newest project by Brooklyn-based  artist George Bates, “Generation Dynamica”. The stainless steel artwork celebrates our  richly diverse communities which are shaped by the contributions and aspirations of the individuals who live in them. This is George’s second project for Arts for Transit. If you are heading to the Rockaways to surf this weekend, visit his glass project “Symphonic Convergence” at Beach 36th Street.

transitmaps:

Submission - Aerial Photo of New York City with Rail Lines Superimposed 
Fantastic work from Transit Maps reader Arnorian showing the New York Subway, PATH and NJ Transit Lines on top of an aerial photograph of central New York City. When you view a transit system like New York’s through the limitations of a small printed or on-line map (be it the official map, the Vignelli diagram or even the hybrid Kick Map), it’s easy to forget just how big and complex it is. A representation like this shows that complexity and scale to full effect, and also looks quite breathtakingly gorgeous.
Bigger image in this Skyscrapercity forum thread.
Update: I’ve replaced the image with a newer version that has been amended to take into account some comments that readers have made. I’d also like to properly attribute the photographer who took the photo that the map is overlaid on: Dennis Dimick — go and check out his Flickr stream!

transitmaps:

Submission - Aerial Photo of New York City with Rail Lines Superimposed 

Fantastic work from Transit Maps reader Arnorian showing the New York Subway, PATH and NJ Transit Lines on top of an aerial photograph of central New York City. When you view a transit system like New York’s through the limitations of a small printed or on-line map (be it the official map, the Vignelli diagram or even the hybrid Kick Map), it’s easy to forget just how big and complex it is. A representation like this shows that complexity and scale to full effect, and also looks quite breathtakingly gorgeous.

Bigger image in this Skyscrapercity forum thread.

Update: I’ve replaced the image with a newer version that has been amended to take into account some comments that readers have made. I’d also like to properly attribute the photographer who took the photo that the map is overlaid on: Dennis Dimick — go and check out his Flickr stream!

New York moves into a modular construction phase

newyorkisforlovers:

antoniatran:

1/2/13 - The Metropolitan Museum, NYC, New York

(Source: antuhneeyuhh)

(Source: havingaface)

"The verdict comes and a large portion of the country—white people, frankly—go on their merry way," he continued. “‘OK, that sporting event is over. The Rodney King trial is over, Amadou Diallo, now this one.’ But for large numbers of Americans, and large numbers of New Yorkers, it’s not as if a sporting event ended. It’s just that nothing changed. We’re kind of going from one thing to another, ‘Wow, OK, nothing has changed.’"

Anthony Weiner on stop-and-frisk and the Trayvon trial as ‘sporting event’ for white people.

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC: LaToya Ruby-Frazier took this photo called “Grandma Ruby and Me” in 2005, when she was barely out of art school, and now it’s in her solo show at the Brooklyn Museum. Ruby-Frazier documents her family’s troubled existence in the moribund steel town of Braddock, PA. She’s not the first photographer to record difficult lives from the inside, as it were, rather than as a dispassionate observer: Nan Goldin and Richard Billingham came first. But Ruby-Frazier seems even more implicated in her shots than they were (she’s often her own subject), and, instead of adopting a pseudo-casual snapshot esthetic, she’s completely mastered the craft of traditional black-and-white shooting and printing. That makes her the Ansel Adams of  the rust belt. (Brooklyn Museum, Emily Winthrop Miles Fund, 2011.63.1. © LaToya Ruby Frazier)
For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic can also be found at the bottom of the home page of thedailybeast.com, and on that site’s Art Beast page.

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC: LaToya Ruby-Frazier took this photo called “Grandma Ruby and Me” in 2005, when she was barely out of art school, and now it’s in her solo show at the Brooklyn Museum. Ruby-Frazier documents her family’s troubled existence in the moribund steel town of Braddock, PA. She’s not the first photographer to record difficult lives from the inside, as it were, rather than as a dispassionate observer: Nan Goldin and Richard Billingham came first. But Ruby-Frazier seems even more implicated in her shots than they were (she’s often her own subject), and, instead of adopting a pseudo-casual snapshot esthetic, she’s completely mastered the craft of traditional black-and-white shooting and printing. That makes her the Ansel Adams of  the rust belt. (Brooklyn Museum, Emily Winthrop Miles Fund, 2011.63.1. © LaToya Ruby Frazier)

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic can also be found at the bottom of the home page of thedailybeast.com, and on that site’s Art Beast page.

(via photographsonthebrain)

"These are people who I thought were friends, people I trusted…"

— NYC mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner, on his sexting buddies.  (via officialssay)

goldman:

A substitute for the three-borough X line, as proposed by Christine Quinn | Capital New York
"If we devoted a quarter of the space to, ‘Tell us what you’d in the real world, where’s the money gonna come from to deliver the things you promised,’ the dialogue would be a lot better."

— Mayor Bloomberg, chiding the press for Weiner-Spitzer coverage.

'Post' editor Col Allan being sent to Australia to guide News Corp. papers there
robinhoodnyc:


This week, Restaurant Week returns to New York City. Two times a year, more than 300 restaurants, both fine-dining classics and trendy newcomers,  offer three-course deals for both lunch and dinner, showcasing New York City’s incredible food industry.
Robin Hood has taken advantage of the food industry, by training low-income New Yorkers for jobs in the food and service industry. And through great partnerships, some of these trainees are even placed in jobs at some of your favorite restaurants around the city! This week we will highlight some of the incredible programs that are producing impressive, and delicious, outcomes.
Unfortunately for many in our city, the issue of access to affordable and nutritious food is a daily struggle. 1.5 million New York City residents, 1 in 4 of which are children, don’t know where their next meal is going to come from. Robin Hood addresses these challenges by funding the two major distributors of free food across the city, city Harvest and Food Bank, as well as directly supporting seven kitchens and pantries. Over the next few weeks, we will introduce you to these sites and the people who ensure that our neighbors don’t go to bed hungry.

robinhoodnyc:

This week, Restaurant Week returns to New York City. Two times a year, more than 300 restaurants, both fine-dining classics and trendy newcomers,  offer three-course deals for both lunch and dinner, showcasing New York City’s incredible food industry.

Robin Hood has taken advantage of the food industry, by training low-income New Yorkers for jobs in the food and service industry. And through great partnerships, some of these trainees are even placed in jobs at some of your favorite restaurants around the city! This week we will highlight some of the incredible programs that are producing impressive, and delicious, outcomes.

Unfortunately for many in our city, the issue of access to affordable and nutritious food is a daily struggle. 1.5 million New York City residents, 1 in 4 of which are children, don’t know where their next meal is going to come from. Robin Hood addresses these challenges by funding the two major distributors of free food across the city, city Harvest and Food Bank, as well as directly supporting seven kitchens and pantries. Over the next few weeks, we will introduce you to these sites and the people who ensure that our neighbors don’t go to bed hungry.

Announcing our latest e-book, ‘Our Town’!
Our football writer Greg Hanlon covered the 2011 Giants by profiling each player, talking to the players themselves, as well as former coaches, relatives, and friends to uncover the origins of their talents and stories.
BUY IT HERE FOR $4.99!
Description: Hakeem Nicks’s grim running joke with his high school coach about how he would keep working hard and thus never “wear the paper hat” of a menial fast-food worker. Chris Canty’s Bronx early childhood as the son an accomplished administrator of government programs. Will Beatty’s childhood speech impediment, which caused him to turn inward and cultivate an impressive array of artistic talents. Antrel Rolle’s faithful adherence, both while playing football and conducting interviews, to abide by the recklessness of that inner “dog.” Eli Manning’s second Super Bowl-winning drive as the requiting of a long ago love letter from the Giants’ general manager.Lost amid the frantic, soap-operatic coverage of the NFL is the fact that each player is the star of his own compelling drama. Here is the story of the 2011 New York Giants, told through the stories of the team’s players themselves.”

Announcing our latest e-book, ‘Our Town’!

Our football writer Greg Hanlon covered the 2011 Giants by profiling each player, talking to the players themselves, as well as former coaches, relatives, and friends to uncover the origins of their talents and stories.

BUY IT HERE FOR $4.99!

Description: Hakeem Nicks’s grim running joke with his high school coach about how he would keep working hard and thus never “wear the paper hat” of a menial fast-food worker. Chris Canty’s Bronx early childhood as the son an accomplished administrator of government programs. Will Beatty’s childhood speech impediment, which caused him to turn inward and cultivate an impressive array of artistic talents. Antrel Rolle’s faithful adherence, both while playing football and conducting interviews, to abide by the recklessness of that inner “dog.” Eli Manning’s second Super Bowl-winning drive as the requiting of a long ago love letter from the Giants’ general manager.

Lost amid the frantic, soap-operatic coverage of the NFL is the fact that each player is the star of his own compelling drama. Here is the story of the 2011 New York Giants, told through the stories of the team’s players themselves.”

by Josh Benson